Excellent vocabulary, grammar and punctuation are just some of the skills required of a scopist/editor. BIVR-accredited scopists have demonstrated the requisite level of understanding of these skills, as well as an ability to understand technology and use bespoke software, and, importantly, being able to work under pressure and as part of a team.

The terms “scopist” and “editor” are commonly used terms to describe someone who works alongside the stenographer, and they play an integral role in finalising the transcript, whether for same-day or delayed delivery. According to Scope School, an internet scoping school run by Linda Evenson: “Scoping is what the court reporting industry calls editing. If a court reporter is the writer, a scopist is the editor.”

  • Georgina Ford

  • Contact Info

  • +44 7976 667987
  • ginford.frr@gmail.com
  • About Our Member

  • I began training in late 1989 having absolutely no idea what the job entailed, even after an interview lasting approximately three hours. I began the course, eventually gaining a speed certificate for 250 wpm on my Palantype machine at the IPS and receiving their Apsey-Haynes medal for the achievement. I honed my skills to be a realtime reporter and now after over 25 years, innumerable hearings and uncounted air miles later, I really can’t imagine doing anything else. In June 2018 I undertook and passed the American NCRA’s Registered Professional Reporter (RPR) examination – one section at 100%. In September 2018 I undertook and passed the American NCRA’s Certified Realtime Reporter examination and more recently their Registered Merit Reporter examination.

  • Member
  • American Depositions, Arbitrations, Court, Disciplinary Hearings/Regulatory Health, NCRA Certified, Realtime, Verbatim STTR/Captioning - On-site
  • UK, EU, Worldwide