Excellent vocabulary, grammar and punctuation are just some of the skills required of a scopist/editor. BIVR-accredited scopists have demonstrated the requisite level of understanding of these skills, as well as an ability to understand technology and use bespoke software, and, importantly, being able to work under pressure and as part of a team.

The terms “scopist” and “editor” are commonly used terms to describe someone who works alongside the stenographer, and they play an integral role in finalising the transcript, whether for same-day or delayed delivery. According to Scope School, an internet scoping school run by Linda Evenson: “Scoping is what the court reporting industry calls editing. If a court reporter is the writer, a scopist is the editor.”

  • Ian Roberts

  • Contact Info

  • +447974 38 38 58
  • iroberts@frreporting.eu
  • http://www.frreporting.eu/
  • About Our Member

  • After I spent some time working on a local newspaper in the 1980s, a friend pointed out an advert for trainee court reporters. Not understanding the role he said, “You’ve done that sort of thing. It’d be ideal”. My knowledge was no greater and I applied. Shortly afterwards – it took until the interview – I discovered my mistake and decided to give it a go anyway. Almost a quarter of a century later, I’m still here and have worked in civil, criminal and coroners’ courts on many high profile trials and inquests, the House of Lords, public inquiries and conferences in the UK. Further afield, I’ve been lucky enough to travel to mainland Europe and beyond for conferences, international arbitrations, World Bank hearings and sessions of the World Trade Organisation.

  • Member
  • American Depositions, Arbitrations, Court, Disciplinary Hearings/Regulatory Health, Public Inquiries, Realtime
  • UK, EU, Worldwide